New York Daily Photo Analytics

Saturday, April 22, 2006

Time Landscape - A Taste of Nature


In 1965 Alan Sonfist, an artist associated with the Earth or Land art movement, conceived of this living work of art which recreates New York City's forest growth of the 17th century - see a synopsis on the sign here. Finally realized in 1978, it has been landmarked. The 8000 square foot plot stands at Laguardia and Houston St., a busy intersection in the Village/Soho area. One wonders how many actually notice this plot - more likely it is overlooked like so much in life and particularly in a city which provides sensory overload. In the autumn, I can actually grab an apple from the branch of an overhanging tree. One morning I greeted a man eating berries, which I had noticed before but never knew were edible. These are remarkable experiences given the completely urbanized locale. And to get a taste of nature in Manhattan is so uplifting ...

6 comments:

Sam said...

That is very cool - I never knew this was here - thanks for pointing out such interesting and little known places!

Vancouver Daily Photo said...

I love learning about interesting parts of your city. Thank you.

Anonymous said...

It's great to find such places in a city, especially on Earth Day.It's always good to be reconnected to nature. Feels like you are able to breathe true air.
Chris

Anonymous said...

I've passed this spot many times. Most of the times I didn't even notice it. The other times I thought to myself, "Can't someone do something nice with this plot of land?"

Thanks for pointing out a bit of history that I would probably never know.

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Anonymous said...

Hi! I'm a French researcher in environmental and art Aesthetics. All art history books always publish an early picture of this work by Alan Sonfist, but seem to keep on forgetting to wonder what has the work become through time. Thanks to the Internet, I found this more current picture, which I'm very thankful to the photographer for. The work still exists and keeps on bringing its particular experience to human and non-human beings, it seems. Greaet!