New York Daily Photo Analytics

Wednesday, November 08, 2006

17 Grove Street

This special clapboard residence at 17 Grove Street in the West Village was built in 1822 by William Hyde, a prosperous window-sash maker. This was the year that also saw an outbreak of yellow fever, which led many New Yorkers to find refuge in the rural area of Greenwich Village. What is unique here is that this dwelling is a wood frame structure - one of the few and the largest remaining intact wood frame buildings in the Village. Construction of wood-frame buildings was banned in the city in 1866 for fire prevention. In 1833, Hyde added a workshop out back - note the small building to the left of the main building (separated by a small courtyard) in the photo. This eventually became a single-family residence. A third floor was added to the main home in 1870. The building has since served many functions - even as a brothel during the Civil War. Of course the building has changed hands over the years. In 1987 both properties were sold for $1.1 million and meticulously restored. I love passing this corner - the bucolic setting and clapboard exterior really transports me in time and space ...

6 comments:

mike said...

brian, great photo. keep finding these NYC gems !

Susan said...

I never really thought about until your post...but you are right...you don't see wooden buildings in NYC.

I love the west village! If I could afford it, that is where I would live in NYC.

Anonymous said...

I looked up the satellite image of this buidling on Google Maps, which I do for most of your photographs. The location, courtyard, and workshop that you describe come into perspective. I enjoy viewing your images and reading your descriptions of the real NYC not found in the tourist literature.

Sally said...

This is the antithesis of the common image one holds of NYC. Beautiful!

Maulleigh said...

I love the historical NYC too.

Daniel said...

The exterior of this building was sometimes shown on Friends as the building housing Ross's apartment.