New York Daily Photo Analytics

Sunday, September 30, 2007

Risk Not Living

The danger at these falls is not what you think I mean. Let me explain. I have not been particularly inclined to do nature photography. Perhaps seeing so much mediocre, ordinary and cliched work (and not wanting to contribute more) or seeing extraordinary work (and not being able to create at that level) has left me on the sidelines.

Of course, these feelings easily apply to other genres of photography as well, so it all comes down to what type of subjects and work inspires you - where your passion lies. Add to the mix living in a dense urban environment and getting away infrequently. So, when I do get to a natural environment, I prefer just experiencing it - not through a camera. For me, this has been the danger of photography - seeing everything as one would through a lens and as a potential photograph. When habituated to this practice, one risks not living...

Photo note: This photo was taken at Binnen Falls in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, near the Lullwater and Audubon Center - click here. I have seen numerous photographs of waterfalls and streams using a long exposure - this creates a very interesting effect with the moving water. Seeing these falls inspired me to give it a try.

5 comments:

J$ said...

the falls look much larger in the photo than they really are due to the lack of anything to compare it to for scale.

Lucy said...

Being able to fully experience in the present moment is a mindfulness practice, and thinking about everything as a photo subject would interfere with living in the present moment. Tho I think becoming aware of all that it is possible to balance inspiration to take a photograph with being there wholeheartedly.

I think the landscape design was intentionally done to make a small park area contain a big experience of nature -- you can't see any of the city around you when you are in certain areas of Prospect Park. Only sometimes a plane flying by overhead reminds you of the modern urban world...

Brian said...

j$ - It's true. I considered this when I cropped the photo but I thought it most important to get the image of the moving water as large as possible so that the effect can best be seen.

RD said...

I understand what you mean--my family rolls their eyes every time I leave the house with my camera. But pictures help me remember places and moments and the emotions tied to them. A beautiful picture, and it doesn't have to be technically perfect, inspires me. Add some language, and I'm transported.

i like your photos a lot. As well as the overall purpose of your site.

• Eliane • said...

I am a happy snapper/note taker kind of photographer. In other words, I have no idea what I am doing but love snapping here and there things that amused, intrigued or amazed me.
What you said reminded me of the film "2 days in Paris" - Julie Delpy was complaining about her boyfriend taking pics in Venise and not being there with her. I agree with that partially. For me, taking picture is something I don't like to do when I am with somebody else. It's one of those things I have to do on my own. Like going to a museum - I like to do that at my rythm.