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Friday, September 09, 2011

Green-Wood


When you have mausoleums the size of trophy homes, you know you are not in an average cemetery. This National Historic Landmark is enormous - 600,000 graves spread out over 478 acres. It is the final resting place of many of New York City's illuminati: Leonard Bernstein, Boss Tweed, Charles Ebbets, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Louis Comfort Tiffany, Horace Greeley, et. al.

Here in New York City, you will have to work to find places not inundated with people. Yet on my recent visit to Green-Wood cemetery, I traversed the place without encountering one other vehicle, only encountering one couple exploring on foot. See my photo gallery of images here.

The place is extraordinary, and is a must see. Paul Goldberger of The New York Times wrote that it was said to be "the ambition of the New Yorker to live upon the Fifth Avenue, to take his airings in the Park, and to sleep with his fathers in Green-Wood." I suggest perusing the official Green-Wood site for everything about the place - visiting, location, tours, events, maps, history, burial search, and famous residents. For a restful, beautiful, contemplative experience, visit Green-Wood...

Related Posts: Veneer of their Lives, Cold Stone, Hidden Cemetery

8 comments:

llandudnopictures said...

Amazing images, that mausoleum is bigger than my house!

Cheri said...

Very interesting and lovely photos!

BertandRose said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Thérèse said...

And so green!

Chicken Underwear said...

I hope I get to visit there before it has to be permanent.

Jack said...

This looks a lot like Cedar Hill Cemetery in Hartford, where J. P. Morgan, Katherine Hepburn and other Hartford luminaries lie when their stars burn out.

Jimmy said...

Oh wow. Amazing! We don't have such cemeteries around here, they are all... well, not round. This one gives me a strange feeling, not a bad one. Good stuff!

___
call South Africa

Oakland Daily Photo said...

Very much like our Mt. View Cemetery designed by Frederick Law Olmstead. Not nearly as big but with equally impressive mausoleums and monuments.